Category: Breaking News

Cartel gunmen leave human heads at Mexican TV station

(BREITBART) — Mexico’s Cartel Jalisco New Generation (CJNG) continues spreading bloodshed and death threats after gunmen left two human heads outside of the Televisa TV station in Guadalajara, Jalisco.

A Mexican federal law enforcement source confirmed to Breitbart Texas that the gunmen left ice chests with human remains in various parts of Jalisco.

While the case left in front of the TV station did not contain any cartel threats against reporters, Mexican authorities suspect the group is looking to get attention for recent violent acts after they threatened a local police chief close to the governor and a local judge. The chest left at the TV station contained two human heads.

“Jesus Humberto Boruel Neri, number 1202, here I leave you these heads, let’s see if you go public, not like on Sunday 19-11-17 when we threw grenades and you hid it,” one of the recovered messages said. “You know that deals have to be kept or do you want us to remind you why you are there and who put you there.”

Law enforcement sources revealed to Breitbart Texas that Boruel is one of the top leaders of the state police, and at one time, was the bodyguard of current Governor Aristoteles Sandoval. During his time as a bodyguard, Boruel was arrested for his alleged role in the murder of a man in Tlaquepaque, but was later released for a lack of evidence. In another part of the city, authorities found another ice chest with a message for a local judge: “[expletive] Judge Molina, you are next.”


Mexican border city suffers 60 cartel murders in November

(BREITBART) — REYNOSA, Tamaulipas — The raging cartel violence in this border city resulted in 60 murders in November.

Rival factions of the Gulf Cartel continue their fight for control of drug trafficking territories and access to Texas. The 60 victims include military and police officers killed in shootouts as well as innocent civilians killed in the crossfire.

Breitbart Texas has been tracking the murders and executions that have been taking place in Reynosa since early May. At that time, two rival factions of the Gulf Cartel went to war for territorial control. Since May, the violence has left more than 324 victims. The fighting followed the death of former regional leader Juan Manuel “Toro” Loiza Salinas, a ruthless cartel boss who terrorized Reynosa for almost two years until he was gunned down by Mexican Marines.

After El Toro’s death, another Gulf Cartel commander named Petronilo “Panilo” Moreno Flores claimed control of the city. However, a faction claiming to be relatives and followers of the late leader led by Luis Alberto “Pelochas” Blanco Flores and Toro’s nephew Humberto “Betillo” Loza Mendez, who also went by the name of Alberto Salinas, have been fighting against Panilo’s forces.

The fighting resulted in fierce gun battles where convoys of gunmen clash along the city’s main avenues, those firefights have killed not only gunmen but also police officers and military personnel tasked with keeping the peace. The firefights also led to various innocent bystanders being killed or wounded by stray bullets.

The fighting between cartel forces also manifested itself in a dramatic increase in kidnappings and executions. As Breitbart’s Texas has reported, cartel gunmen have resorted to incinerating the bodies of their victims as well as to using shallow pits to dump the bodies of their rivals.

The most recent casualty took place on Friday early morning when a State police officer died in a gun battle. A squad of state cops was responding to a call of help from military forces who had been battling a team of gunmen. Two cartel gunmen also died during that clash in the Jarachinas Sur neighborhood.


Homicides have hit a new high in Mexico — but that’s not the only sign of growing insecurity

(BUSINESS INSIDER) — By Christopher Woody

The number of homicides in Mexico has risen steadily over the past three years, particularly in areas where drug-related crime is high.

While much of the violence is related to organized crime, the Mexican government has been criticized for its heavy-handed response, which has led to some high-profile cases of abuse.

The country’s deteriorating security situation promises to play a significant role in the presidential election next year.

Mexico’s 2,764 homicide victims in October is the most recorded in any month over the last 20 years, according to data collected by the country’s federal government.

The new data puts 2017 on pace to be the most violent year in Mexico since the government began releasing homicide data in 1997.

Federal data also showed that 2,371 homicide investigations, which can include more than one victim, were opened in October — the highest monthly total over the past two decades.

The 23,968 homicide victims reported though October this year are nearly 27% more than the 18,895 recorded over the same period last year.

This year’s total through 10 months was almost 55% more than the 15,480 recorded over the same period in 2015.

Mexican federal data may in fact undercount the number of homicides in the country, however.

Civil-society groups have suggested that state governments, which submit crime data to the federal government, may misrepresent or manipulate the number of intentional killings.


Tijuana murder rate spikes from cartel violence

(BREITBART) — by Robert Arce

The murder rate in the Mexican border city of Tijuana spiked with a record-breaking number of murders. The number of murders climbed as drug cartels battle over control of key drug trafficking routes and the control of the lucrative street-level drug distribution business in the region. The escalating violence in the large border city can be attributed primarily to the hostilities between the Sinaloa Cartel and their one-time ally, Cartel Jalisco Nueva Generacion (CJNG).

In recent days, the number of murders in Tijuana for the year surpassed 1,500 after the city saw six murders in a seven-hour period, local news outlets reported.

The murder victims included one man who was shot inside a home. Two other men who were also wounded but survived the attack. In a separate case, three different victims were left throughout the city — all showing similar methods of torture and murder. The victims had all been shot in the head, had their hands and feet tied, and were wrapped in blankets. The last murder dealt with the discovery of a severed human leg. That victim’s body has yet to be found.

The escalating number of murders in Tijuana surpassed 1,500 well before the end of the year. This reveals a dramatic spike when compared to the previous record-setting year in 2016 when only 910 were recorded. According to the San Diego Tribune, the 2016 figure had been alarming at the time since it had broken the 2008 record of 844 murders.

As the cartel-fueled turf-wars continue to rage, the spike in murders places Tijuana as one of the leading cities in homicides for 2017. According to Frontera.Info, the spike in murders is fueled by the turf wars between cartel-connected gangs who handle the street level distribution of drugs. Another reason behind the spike in violence deals with Tijuana being one of the main drug trafficking areas that fuel the U.S. drug market in California. The city also serves as a hub for distribution into other major cities throughout the nation.


Yes, border walls are needed, and they’re already everywhere across the globe

(PJ MEDIA) — By Michel Gurfinkiel

One may support or oppose the Trump administration’s grand design in terms of home security: the building, or the “updating,” of a 3200-kilometer barrier between the United States and Mexico. One cannot deny, however, that such structures — hermetic and heavily monitored separations, instead of merely classic borders — are quite common today.

While the Iron Curtain and Bamboo Curtain separating the USSR and Red China from the rest of the world were partially dismantled, some other 20th century barriers are still extant. And new ones are being erected all over the world at steady pace.

Le Point, a French right-of-center weekly, has published a comprehensive map in this respect. According to it, and other documents, the oldest existing barriers are the outcome of wars of aggression:

The “demilitarized zone” (DMZ) between North and South Korea — in fact, one of the most militarized fences in the world — was created in 1953 as part of the armistice agreement that ended a three-year war initiated by the Communist North Korean regime. The 180-kilometer long Attila that separates the Muslim-Turkish populated Northern Cyprus from the Christian-Greek populated southern Republic of Cyprus was unilaterally set up by Turkey after it invaded the Mediterranean island in 1975. The Sand Wall, a 2720-kilometer barrier put in place between 1980 and 1987 and manned by 100,000 Moroccan soldiers, marked Morocco’s 1975 unilateral annexation of the former Spanish colony of Western Sahara.

Likewise, the 120-kilometer fence on the Israeli-Syrian and Israeli-Lebanese borders and the 51-kilometer fence on the Israeli-Gazan line were set up in the wake of repeated aggressions by Arab states or terrorist organizations against the Jewish State from 1948 to 2014. The almost 3000-kilometer fence on the Indian-Pakistani border is the result of the many wars and skirmishes involving the two South Asian nations since 1947:

However, the more recent barriers were built or are being built within a very different context. Their main purpose is to prevent large-scale terrorist infiltrations or to monitor mass migrations.

The largest of them are to be found in the Islamic world. This should not come as a surprise, since many Islamic countries are hotbeds of competing jihadist movements or migratory pools or both.

There is a 3300-kilometer wall between secular but Hindu-dominated India and Muslim Bangladesh. Some 2700 kilometers of walls surround Uzbekistan, 1400 kilometers lie on Saudi Arabia’s borders, 1200 kilometers on Iran’s Eastern borders, and 700 kilometers on Oman’s borders. Jordan is completing a 500-kilometer fence on its Syrian and Iraqi borders; Tunisia a 200-kilometer fence along its Libyan border.

Israel, a Jewish islet in the Muslim ocean, operates some 550 kilometers of barriers in the West Bank and on its Jordanian and Egyptian borders in addition to its aforementioned military fences. Much smaller walls are to be found as well in the same area: Egypt built 11 kilometers on its Gaza border, and a combined 11.81 kilometers of fence separate the Spanish enclaves of Ceuta and Melilla from Morocco.

More barriers dot other parts of the world.


Mexican cartels in Michoacan carry out 20 executions in one day

(BREITBART) — MORELIA, Michoacan — Mexican authorities appear powerless to stop the cartel violence that continues to rage in one southern state. The fighting between rival criminal organizations left 20 people dead in a single day.

The executions on Friday followed a week of gun battles that continue spreading terror in this state located west of Mexico City. Despite the large-scale gun battles, state authorities continue ignoring the violence. The government has yet to issue any security alerts.


24,000 homicides – Mexico on pace for most violent year in history as drug wars spiral out of control

(ZERO HEDGE) — by Tyler Durden

As our elected officials in Washington D.C. continue to debate whether or not Trump’s proposed border wall would be an effective deterrent to those looking to come to the U.S. illegally, the one thing that is becoming increasingly clear is that Mexico’s drug wars are spiraling out of control…a fact that the Trump administration will almost certainly leverage as it seeks additional funding for border security.

As PanAmPost notes, Mexico has recorded a staggering 24,000 homicides in 2017 through September with 73% of those murders being tied to organized crime.

2017 might be the most violent year in Mexican history, one NGO claims. Semáforo Delictivo said that, due to the 24,000 homicides between January and September, the year is proving even worse than 2011, when President Felipe Calderón’s war on drugs led to 22,000 homicides.

President of the organization, Santiago Roel, said that 73 percent of murders committed in the first eight months of the year were related to organized crime. He said that in 2007, there were 2,828 executions. Now, a decade later, 18,017 have been reported.

All high-impact crimes have increased during the current year, including abductions, homicides and grand theft auto at gunpoint. According to Roel, the main cause of violence and corruption is the “Mérida Plan,” which focuses on eradicating drug cartels.

Moreover, some 85,000 insured vehicles have been stolen over the past 12 months, with 60% being considered ‘violent’.

According to the Mexican Association of Insurance Institutions, violent car robberies are at their highest point in the country’s history. Between October 2016 and September 2017, 85,943 insured cars have been stolen. Sixty percent of the robberies were violent.

Recaredo Arias, the association’s Director General, said that elements of organized crime have been identified in these cases, and that more urgent measures are needed to combat the problem.

The states of Guerrero, Sinaloa, Mexico City, Tlaxcala, Puebla, Michoacán, Zacatecas, Morelos, Tabasco and Tamaulipas, have the highest numbers of violent car thefts, he said.

Meanwhile, as Fox News pointed out earlier this week, the drug wars south of the border are seemingly on the precipice of becoming way more sophisticated after 4 men were arrested by federal police carrying a drone equipped with an improvised explosive device wired for remote detonation.

Mexican Federal Police arrested four men Oct. 20 in Guanajuanto who were driving a stolen vehicle equipped with a 3DR Solo Quadcopter drone attached to an IED, Small Wars Journal reported. The drone had a range of about half a mile, but modifications would have allowed it to fly farther.


Cartel shootout in Chihuahua with 100 gunmen lasted eight hours before troops intervened

(BREITBART) — by Robert Arce

More than 100 gunmen took part in a series of large-scale shootouts between factions of the Sinaloa and Juarez Cartels in the border state of Chihuahua. The skirmish took place in a rural mountain area that went on for more than eight hours until state and federal authorities arrived.

The fighting occurred in the rural community of Uruachi where the 1,100 residents were left helpless as the local police force stood helplessly after being outgunned and outnumbered by the large cartel armies, El Diario de Chihuahua reported.

The convoys of gunmen taking part in the fighting that went on for hours were described as carrying high-powered rifles and wearing tactical gear. When the two rival armies clashed near the rural community, local police officers were rapidly overwhelmed, forcing them to back off and wait for state and military forces to arrive. According to statements made by local mayor Hacel Campos Rascon, authorities arrived eight hours after the shooting began.

According to the state attorney general and Breitbart law enforcement sources, the fighting took place between a group called Gente Nueva, who are part of the Los Salazar faction of the Sinaloa Cartel. Gente Nueva is currently led by Noriel “El Chueco” Portillo. The second group involved in this confrontation was led by César Daniel “H2” Manjarrez Alonso, whose organization is under the Juarez Cartel, also known as the Nuevo Cartel de Juarez (NCDJ).

Sources within the Chihuahua Attorney General’s Office revealed to Breitbart Texas that the confrontation is believed to be in retaliation for the recent kidnapping of the chief of police of the community of Carichí, Cipriano “Pano” Escárcega Aranda, El Heraldo De Chihuahua reported. The local police chief is also the father of Julio César “El Tigre” Escárcega Murillo, the leader of the Sinaloa Cartel faction called Gente Nueva del Tigre.

The kidnapping took place on October 3 when a convoy of at least eight trucks with 20 armed cartel gunmen led by Manjarrez Alonso stormed the house of the police chief. Despite a gun battle to rescue the police chief, the kidnappers were able to escape with their victim.

The Sinaloa and the Juarez Cartels are fighting over control of key smuggling routes to bring drugs and humans into the U.S. One of these areas being fought over is the remote home of the Tarahumara Indians, who live in the mountainous communities surrounding Uruachi.

Robert Arce is a retired Phoenix Police detective with extensive experience working Mexican organized crime and street gangs. Arce has worked in the Balkans, Iraq, Haiti, and recently completed a three-year assignment in Monterrey, Mexico, working out of the Consulate for the United States Department of State, International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Program, where he was the Regional Program Manager for Northeast Mexico (Coahuila, Tamaulipas, Nuevo Leon, Durango, San Luis Potosi, Zacatecas.)
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Armored convoy of cartel gunmen invades Mexican border town

(BREITBART) — RIO BRAVO, Tamaulipas — Dozens of SUVs filled with Gulf Cartel gunmen rolled into the border city of Rio Bravo, waiving rifles as they prepared to hunt rivals in what became a day of fierce shootouts.

A video taken by one of the gunmen and shared on social media shows the moment the cartel presumably with the Los Escorpiones (Scorpions) group roll into the city. Rio Bravo is immediately south of the McAllen, Texas, metro area.

“Rio Bravo que onda (what’s up) …. matalos a todos (kill them all), says one of the gunmen as he sticks a black AR-15 rifle out of the window.

The incursion by one faction the Gulf Cartel was part of an ongoing war for territorial control. The group called Los Escorpiones rolled in from Matamoros in armored SUVs to kill key leaders of the rival faction commonly known as Los Metros. When the two factions met throughout the day, terror ensued as the rivals unleashed thousands of rounds of ammunition and explosives on each other.

Information provided to Breitbart Texas by the Tamaulipas government revealed that the gunmen were riding in SUVs with makeshift armor and artillery weapons. Authorities seized 13 armored SUVs, 10 stock vehicles, four grenade launchers, 23 grenades, a Barrett .50 caliber rifle, 23 assault rifles, and machine guns.


Cartel-linked former Mexican border governor denied bond, must stay in jail

(BREITBART) — by Ildefonso Ortiz and Brandon Darby

A state judge in Tamaulipas formally charged a cartel-linked former governor and ordered him to remain behind bars without bond.

Eugenio Hernandez Flores, a former governor of Tamaulipas, will have to remain behind bars at a state prison he once ruled over on charges of embezzlement and money laundering. The judge notified Hernandez on Thursday morning that he found enough evidence to criminally charge the former politician, information provided to Breitbart Texas by the Tamaulipas government revealed.

Agents with the Tamaulipas Attorney General’s Office arrested Hernandez last week as part of an investigation into the illicit purchase of state-owned property resulting in the charges of embezzlement and money laundering. Hernandez was scheduled to have a hearing on Thursday morning where local politicians and political analysts suspected or claimed that Hernandez would be released.

Hernandez is currently listed as a fugitive by the U.S. Department of Justice, Homeland Security Investigations, and the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration on multiple money laundering charges, Breitbart Texas reported. Testimony in other related cases and civil matters claim Hernandez not only laundered embezzled funds, but also cleaned hefty bribes from Mexican drug cartels.

The Tamaulipas case against Hernandez deals with the purchase of a large tract of coastal state-owned property that the politician allegedly purchased at 1 percent of its fair market value through the use of various shell companies and straw men.