Tagged: heroin

Heroin turf wars among Mexican cartels fueling homicides

(NEWSMAX) — Growing turf wars among Mexican drug cartels after the arrest of Jaoquin “El Chapo” Guzman in 2014 has been linked to the huge surge in inner-city drug violence as these groups distribute heroin through street-level gangs, a new analysis has found.

“There is reason to believe that recent crime spikes are associated with a growing heroin market and the capture of drug lord ‘El Chapo’ Guzman, both of which have caused local cartel affiliates to battle for territory and kill Americans caught up in the crossfire,” the American Enterprise Institute said.

AEI analyzed data from the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration, which identifies the cartels as “Mexican transnational criminal organizations” — or TCOs.

The groups “remain the greatest criminal drug threat to the United States,” the DEA said in a recent report. “No other group can challenge them in the near term.”

The agency added later in the report that the cartels “are moving to expand their share of US illicit drug markets, particularly heroin markets.

“Many gangs rely on Mexican TCOs as their primary drug source of supply, and Mexican TCOs depend on street-level gangs, many of which already have a customer base, for drug distribution.”

[READ MORE]

What the DEA had to say about Pablo Acosta

The following are highlights from a DEA report entitled The Pablo Acosta Organization, a report based primarily on investigations carried out by U.S. Customs Service agents in the Presidio, Texas, area:

There has been a continuous increase in the trafficking of Mexican heroin, cocaine, and marijuana into the United States from Mexico over the last few years. Many fields of opium poppies were found and destroyed in Coahuila and Chihuahua in 1984. However, the production of opium is expected to rise in 1985. Mexican opium is converted directly into heroin in Mexico and is usually smuggled across the southern border.

There has also been a noticeable increase in the smuggling of cocaine through Mexico, with significant quantities of cocaine produced in South America crossing the southwest border, and although the largest worldwide marijuana seizure to date occurred in the state of Chihuahua in November 1984, it is believed that there are major quantities still available. The amount of marijuana seized along the U.S.-Mexico border has more than tripled in the last year. Recent seizures of very high-grade marijuana tops suggests the existence of very large stockpiles still in Mexico. Read more »