Tagged: la plaza

Los Zetas gunmen swim into Texas during firefight to escape

(BREITBART) — PIEDRAS NEGRAS, Coahuila — A group of five gunmen from the Los Zetas cartel crossed into Texas to escape from Mexican police after a firefight on the banks of the Rio Grande.

Members of Coahuila State Police followed information about an upcoming drug shipment to a rural area on the banks of the Rio Grande. They spotted five gunmen trying to cross drug bundles into Texas. As soon as the gunmen saw the police officers, they began to fire their weapons trying to keep them away. Mexican authorities fought off the attack forcing the gunmen to retreat. The gunmen left the drugs behind as they crossed the Rio Grande into Texas. Once on the U.S. side, they gunmen disappeared and have not been caught.

Breitbart Texas has confirmed with Mexican authorities that the firefight took place a little over two weeks ago just outside the El Moral rural community near the Mexican city of Piedras Negras, Coahuila. The scene of the shootout is not far from the Texas border city of Eagle Pass.

The gun battle on the edge of the river, was the result of an ongoing investigation into the current operational structure of the Cartel Del Noreste (CDN) faction of the Los Zetas cartel. Late last month, Coahuila police officers arrested the number two leader of the CDN in Piedras Negras. The arrest came after a fierce gun battle near the Rio Grande. According to authorities, the leader was only identified as 25-year-old Ernesto (last-name-unknown) who claimed to be the second in command for the cartel in the area.

In his statements to police, the man claimed that the criminal organization was preparing for possible efforts by their rivals to take over the “plaza” or territory from the CDN. The investigation led to the thwarted drug smuggling attempt that turned into a gun battle.

[READ MORE]

Preface by Chuck Bowden

This book could function as an owner’s manual for the Mexican drug cartels. Here we find the first good description of the plaza — that arrangement where the Mexican government seeks a partner to supervise all criminal activity in a city. And how to maintain discipline by killing everyone connected to a lost load lest a traitor survive. And also the history of the shift of power from Colombia to Mexico, when American efforts hampered the pathways in Florida and made Mexico the trampoline for cocaine shipments into the U.S. markets.

I remember in the mid-nineties paying fifty dollars for a copy of Drug Lord in a used bookstore in El Paso and being damned happy to get my hands on it.

Terrence Poppa was a reporter for the El Paso Herald-Post. In the eighties, he captured the rise and fall of Pablo Acosta in Ojinaga, the border town across from Presidio, Texas. By that act, he wrote the history of the key moment when flights of cocaine from Columbia entered the Mexican economy. He interviewed the players, got down their life histories and made the indelible point that the people written off by their own country as ill-educated bumkins were creative and were turning power on its head in the nation. Acosta’s slaughter by Mexican comandante Guillermo Gonzalez Calderoni, with the help of the FBI, ended this kind of access. Since then, becoming famous and talking to the press — which Acosta did — has been seen as a fatal decision. And since then, the Mexican drug industry has become a source of thirty to fifty billion dollars of foreign currency a year for the Mexican economy — second only to oil, and now the oil fields of Mexico are collapsing. Read more »