Tagged: Mexico

Mexican drug traffickers and ISIS terrorists are cut from the same cloth

(NOSCOMUNICAMOS-SHOEBAT) — Iraq and Syria are in a very bad situation, but there is one country that is much more severe when it comes to Christian persecution: Mexico. ISIS has killed hundreds of Christians, but the pagan drug cartels in Mexico have killed tens of thousands of Christians. They behead people, they kidnap children, tear out their hearts and cannibalize them in pagan rituals; they kidnap women and make them sex slaves; they melt people alive in giant vats of acid. These victims are not in the hundreds, but the tens of thousands. The cartels worship the devil and the abysmal spirits.

The Mexican cartels are just as evil as Muslim terrorists, and they have butchered tens of thousands of Christians in Mexico. A major militia leader in Mexico, Jorge Vasquez Valencia, joined us at Shoebat.com to explain the nature of the fight against the cartels, how the cartels have butchered tens of thousands of Christians, and why Donald Trump is right about the border.

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Ret. Lt. Gen. Flynn: Terror-linked nations ‘cutting deals’ with Mexican cartels to enter U.S.

(BREITBART) — Retired Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn, the former head of the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA), tells Breitbart News Daily on SiriusXM that countries that are known to support radical Islamic terrorism are “cutting deals” with Mexican cartels for access to human smuggling routes into the United States.

Citing photos from the U.S. Border Patrol component of the Customs and Border Protection (CBP) agency on Friday, Gen. Flynn also told Washington Political Editor Matthew Boyle, host of Breitbart News Daily, that there are signs in Arabic posted along human smuggling routes at the section of the border that lies in Texas providing directions for how to sneak into the United States.

Moreover, the former DIA chief said that the Shiite Lebanese narco-terrorist group Hezbollah, an Iranian proxy, is illegally trafficking humans, drugs, and other contraband into the United States.

His comments echo recent warnings from the U.S. military, suggesting that criminal groups in Latin America may be collaborating with Islamic extremist organizations.

Gen. Flynn’s remarks came while he was discussing his new book The Field of Fight: How We Can Win the Global War Against Radical Islam and Its Allies during Friday’s edition of Breitbart News Daily.

He told the host:

I talk about this in the book — about the threat in Central and South America from countries like Iran who have organizations like Hezbollah who run a large transnational organized criminal organization which move narcotics and other commodities as well as humans into our country…

I know from my friends in the Border Patrol in CBP that there are… radical Islamist countries, state-sponsored, that are cutting deals with Mexican drug cartels for some of what they call the lanes of entry into our country. And I have personally seen the photos of the signage along those paths that are in Arabic… they’re like way points along that path as you come in. Primarily in this case the one that I saw was in Texas and it’s literally… signs in Arabic… [that say] ‘this way, move to this point’…

This rise of Muslims and radicalized Muslims coming into our country illegally is something that we should pay very, very close attention to.

Gen. Flynn’s remarks came in response to Boyle asking for his reaction to Breitbart News’ recent analysis of CBP data showing that the U.S. border authorities apprehended 916 illegals from terrorism-linked countries, officially known as Special Interest Aliens (SIAs), in 2015 (454) and 2015 (462).

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Mexico’s cartels are much more dangerous to Americans than ISIS

(THE DAILY BEAST) — Mexico is a place of many rumors and much chisme, or gossip. One of the most frightening rumors you hear these days—especially given the tragic, ISIS-inspired shooting in Orlando—is that members of the so-called Islamic State have infiltrated the cartels, seeking to recruit hardened sicarios, hit men, to their cause.

ISIS’s nefarious motive, naturally, would be to use the cartels’ drug shipping networks and smuggling tunnels to ferret terrorists, or even weapons of mass destruction, across the U.S. border.

Fortunately such tales remains nothing but chisme—and not very plausible rumor mongering at that.

Although some far-right media outlets in the U.S. have presented the unholy alliance of jihadist warrior and Aztec assassin as likely, if not inevitable, so far there’s absolutely no evidence behind such claims.

(Full disclosure: I spent eight months out of the last year reporting up close with both law enforcement and the cartels in Mexico and, after much searching for just such a headline-grabbing, cartel-ISIS link, was unable to find so much as a prayer rug. Or anybody who knew what a prayer rug was.)

In fact, the two groups actually seem more like natural enemies.

Although the much-published story about Chapo Guzmán threatening to launch open war on ISIS turned out to be false, there’s a reason the meme seemed so believable when it broke.

That’s because it’s hard to imagine a wealth-loving, famously decadent crime lord like Guzmán—or any of his fellows—getting along with their dour, tee-totaling, thobe-wearing counterparts. The Mexican press have also had great fun at ISIS’s expense, wittily skewering the unlikely Islamic invasion.

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Here are 3 failures in Mexico’s drug war

(DALLAS MORNING NEWS) — By RICARDO AINSLIE

By most accounts, the so-called kingpin strategy — the oft-decried tactic of taking down top cartel leaders — in Mexico’s drug war has generated significant violence, as would-be successors vie to fill the leadership vacuum. In fact, in a recent Dallas Morning News article a U.S. agent says, “We all thought we were doing the right thing, but truth is we didn’t fully anticipate the violence, and that’s on us.”

But this strategy isn’t the problem. If you have the head of the Zetas in your sights, it’s a no-brainer that he has to be taken down.

What is “on us,” as co-sponsors of law enforcement actions against organized crime in Mexico, are three failures of the imagination that continue to haunt both countries.

First is the failure to understand the depth and complexity of Mexico’s criminal networks. Had they done their homework, law enforcement agencies on both sides of the border would have discovered that each of the big cartels included many smaller groups, each linked by a vague common cause of making illicit money by whatever means. There is a complex and ambitious hierarchy at work, extending from neighborhood gangs that steal cars and sell drugs on the streets to the drug trafficking organizations that we call cartels. They are highly sophisticated transnational businesses whose profitability must be the envy of every major American corporation.

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Experts: Mexico stonewalled investigation into killing of 43 students

(BUSINESS INSIDER) — A panel of international experts on Sunday accused Mexico’s government of failing to fully cooperate with their probe into the fate of 43 trainee teachers apparently massacred in 2014, the most notorious human rights case in Mexico in recent years.

The independent panel of experts said the government’s stonewalling stopped them from reaching the truth as they wrap up their work and prepare to leave Mexico.

The attorney general’s office, they said, did not let them re-interview detainees accused of the crime or obtain other information in a timely fashion. Prosecutors, meanwhile, did not pursue investigative angles that the experts had suggested.

“The delays in obtaining evidence that could be used to figure out possible lines of investigation translates into a decision (to allow) impunity,” the report by the experts, commissioned by the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR), said.

A spokesman for the attorney general’s office said the office would probably comment after the experts concluded a news conference.

The grisly case underscored the deep impunity that reigns in many hyper violent parts of Mexico, and tarnished President Enrique Pena Nieto’s reputation.

Mexico’s government says that corrupt police handed the students over to drug gang henchmen in late 2014, who then incinerated them at a garbage dump in the southwestern Mexican state of Guerrero.

The experts say that the government’s fire theory is scientifically impossible given the heat needed to reduce human remains to ash.

The remains of just one of the 43 has been identified from a charred bone fragment.

IACHR has said it will not renew the experts’ term because the government was opposed to an extension.

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About Drug Lord, the Life and Death of a Mexican Kingpin

Donald Trump wants to build a wall between the United States and Mexico, and he vowed to do so if he became president of the United States. The wall, he argued, will stop the flow of drugs into the country as well as impede the illegal entry of people across the border. Whether Trump is right or wrong about the need for a wall is a matter of fierce debate that will only grow in intensity now that he is president.

What cannot be disputed, however, is that there is a huge amount of drugs coming across the border, no different than in the past. There is also a greater influx of people coming now from all parts of the world than ever before. Who are these people? What is their motive for entering the United States?

Another matter than is beyond dispute is that smuggling activities related to drugs and people are controlled by organized crime groups, and to some extent organized crime is controlled by agencies of the government of Mexico. Read more »

Preface by Chuck Bowden

This book could function as an owner’s manual for the Mexican drug cartels. Here we find the first good description of the plaza — that arrangement where the Mexican government seeks a partner to supervise all criminal activity in a city. And how to maintain discipline by killing everyone connected to a lost load lest a traitor survive. And also the history of the shift of power from Colombia to Mexico, when American efforts hampered the pathways in Florida and made Mexico the trampoline for cocaine shipments into the U.S. markets.

I remember in the mid-nineties paying fifty dollars for a copy of Drug Lord in a used bookstore in El Paso and being damned happy to get my hands on it.

Terrence Poppa was a reporter for the El Paso Herald-Post. In the eighties, he captured the rise and fall of Pablo Acosta in Ojinaga, the border town across from Presidio, Texas. By that act, he wrote the history of the key moment when flights of cocaine from Columbia entered the Mexican economy. He interviewed the players, got down their life histories and made the indelible point that the people written off by their own country as ill-educated bumkins were creative and were turning power on its head in the nation. Acosta’s slaughter by Mexican comandante Guillermo Gonzalez Calderoni, with the help of the FBI, ended this kind of access. Since then, becoming famous and talking to the press — which Acosta did — has been seen as a fatal decision. And since then, the Mexican drug industry has become a source of thirty to fifty billion dollars of foreign currency a year for the Mexican economy — second only to oil, and now the oil fields of Mexico are collapsing. Read more »