Tagged: Michoacán

Women kicked out organized crime in this Mexican town

(MY SAN ANTONIO) — More than 180,000 people have been killed in Mexico since then-President Felipe Calderon sent the army to fight organized crime groups in his native state of Michoacan in 2006.

But one small town in that state says it hasn’t had a homicide since 2011 because its residents – led by women – took up arms to kick out groups who had expanded from drug trafficking into illegal logging.

While overall in Michoacán, federal authorities say 614 people have been killed this year, a 16 percent increase from 2016, the people of Cherán say they’ve become immune to serious crime. They expelled the politicians and local police, and community members now patrol the area wearing uniforms emblazoned with the slogan “For Justice, Security and the Restoration of Our Territory.”

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7th Mexican journalist murdered in months, killers incinerated corpse

(BREITBART) — by Ildefonso Ortiz and Brandon Darby

MEXICO CITY — MEXICO CITY — Mexican authorities identified the charred remains of an investigative journalist from Michoacán kidnapped a month ago. This is the seventh case of a reporter who covered the government or drug cartels being murdered.

On Monday afternoon, the Michoacan Attorney General’s Office (PGJ) announced the identification Salvador Adame, a journalist who was kidnapped a month prior. Adame’s charred remains were found in Mid-May in an area called Devil’s Creek or Barranca del Diablo not far from a state highway between the rural communities of Nueva Italia and Lombardia. The body was identified after investigators performed DNA testing, Michoacan authorities revealed.

Salvador Adame was the director for a local news station called 6TV in Michoacan, the same state where he was kidnapped by cartel gunmen on May 18 near the rural community of Nueva Italia. For more than one month, the fate of the journalist went unknown. Various colleagues took to social media to express their outrage and even the U.S. Embassy tweeted about his disappearance.

According to information gained from the interrogation of Daniel “El Cabezon” Ruiz, a top enforcer for the Familia Michoacana/Knights Templar, Adame’s kidnapping, murder, and incineration was carried out by Feliciano “Chano Peña” Ledezma. Daniel Ruiz was recently arrested by authorities in the operation where they captured the head of the Nueva Familia, Ignacio “El Cenizo” Andrade Renteria the leader of the Familia Michoacana/Knights Templar.

According to Michoacan law enforcement officials, the late Salvador Adame was a childhood friend of Ruiz–leading to his cooperation in an effort to recover the slain journalist’s body.

As Breitbart Texas reported, 2017 has been a deadly year for media with a total of seven investigative journalists critical of Mexico’s government or drug cartels being killed. Days before Adame was kidnapped, in the Mexican state of Sinaloa, gunmen murdered award-winning journalist Javier Valdez, sparking outrage among local journalists.

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Why the military will never beat Mexico’s cartels

(THE DAILY BEAST) — “Any war that requires the suspension of reason as a necessity for support is a bad war,” wrote Norman Mailer in Armies of the Night. That phrase, applied to Vietnam almost 50 years ago, has come back into my head any number of times during the eight months of the last year I’ve spent covering the Mexican drug war.

For most of that time I’ve been on the front lines of the conflict—often in and around the sun-scorched and cartel-dominated valley called Tierra Caliente—where the daily suspension of one’s reasoning faculties can be a useful coping mechanism.

Even so, at times I’ve found it very hard to support the Mexican government’s increasingly surreal approach to drug war tactics and strategy.

For example, on a recent trip to the village of Dos Aguas, high in the Sierra Madre mountains of Michoacán state, I was told by locals that there were no police or military forces present in the vicinity at all. Not even a sheriff. The town had formerly been protected by a group of vigilantes known as autodefensas, but the state government ordered the group to disband last February under penalty of arrest.

Now that the vigilantes are gone, Dos Aguas is run by a chieftain from the Knights Templar cartel, who calls himself “El Tena.” He travels the mountains in a caravan of more than a dozen trucks, led by a pick-up with a .50 caliber machine gun mounted in the bed. El Tena goes where he likes and does what he pleases—including running meth labs and illegal logging operations in the sierra.

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