Tagged: Rio Grande

Gunmen execute young couple, set vehicle on fire near Texas border

(BREITBART) — PIEDRAS NEGRAS, Coahuila — Authorities continue to investigate why a group of gunmen executed a young couple on the banks of the Rio Grande River and set their vehicle on fire.

Coahuila state investigators recently responded to the banks of the Rio Grande River near the Santa Maria neighborhood where they found a late model Jeep Commander fully engulfed in flames. Neighbors had called authorities after spotting the vehicle on fire.

As authorities got closer, they discovered a woman and a man laying in a pool of blood near the vehicle. The victims had been shot in the head but the woman was still alive.

Emergency medical personnel rushed the woman to a local hospital where she later died from her injuries. Soon after the murder, authorities were able to identify the victims as 28-year-old Valentin Guerrero and 24-year-old Montserrat Reyes Galaviz.

Authorities have not made a motive for the murder public. However, the border city of Piedras Negras has a long history of being a drug trafficking corridor for the Los Zetas drug cartel. Unlike other cartels, Los Zetas have sought to distinguish themselves through their ruthlessness and gory methods of executions.

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Preface by Chuck Bowden

This book could function as an owner’s manual for the Mexican drug cartels. Here we find the first good description of the plaza — that arrangement where the Mexican government seeks a partner to supervise all criminal activity in a city. And how to maintain discipline by killing everyone connected to a lost load lest a traitor survive. And also the history of the shift of power from Colombia to Mexico, when American efforts hampered the pathways in Florida and made Mexico the trampoline for cocaine shipments into the U.S. markets.

I remember in the mid-nineties paying fifty dollars for a copy of Drug Lord in a used bookstore in El Paso and being damned happy to get my hands on it.

Terrence Poppa was a reporter for the El Paso Herald-Post. In the eighties, he captured the rise and fall of Pablo Acosta in Ojinaga, the border town across from Presidio, Texas. By that act, he wrote the history of the key moment when flights of cocaine from Columbia entered the Mexican economy. He interviewed the players, got down their life histories and made the indelible point that the people written off by their own country as ill-educated bumkins were creative and were turning power on its head in the nation. Acosta’s slaughter by Mexican comandante Guillermo Gonzalez Calderoni, with the help of the FBI, ended this kind of access. Since then, becoming famous and talking to the press — which Acosta did — has been seen as a fatal decision. And since then, the Mexican drug industry has become a source of thirty to fifty billion dollars of foreign currency a year for the Mexican economy — second only to oil, and now the oil fields of Mexico are collapsing. Read more »